The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale
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"To quietly persevere in storing up what is learned, to continue studying without respite, to instruct others without growing weary--is this not me?"
--Confucius

Confucius is recognized as China''s first and greatest teacher, and his ideas have been the fertile soil in which the Chinese cultural tradition has flourished. Now, here is a translation of the recorded thoughts and deeds that best remember Confucius--informed for the first time by the manuscript version found at Dingzhou in 1973, a partial text dating to 55 BCE and only made available to the scholarly world in 1997. The earliest Analects yet discovered, this work provides us with a new perspective on the central canonical text that has defined Chinese culture--and clearly illuminates the spirit and values of Confucius.

Confucius (551-479 BCE) was born in the ancient state of Lu into an era of unrelenting, escalating violence as seven of the strongest states in the proto-Chinese world warred for supremacy. The landscape was not only fierce politically but also intellectually. Although Confucius enjoyed great popularity as a teacher, and many of his students found their way into political office, he personally had little influence in Lu. And so he began to travel from state to state as an itinerant philosopher to persuade political leaders that his teachings were a formula for social and political success. Eventually, his philosophies came to dictate the standard of behavior for all of society--including the emperor himself.

Based on the latest research and complete with both Chinese and English texts, this revealing translation serves both as an excellent introduction to Confucian thought and as an authoritative addition to sophisticated debate.

From the Inside Flap

"To quietly persevere in storing up what is learned, to continue studying without respite, to instruct others without growing weary--is this not me?"
--Confucius

Confucius is recognized as China''s first and greatest teacher, and his ideas have been the fertile soil in which the Chinese cultural tradition has flourished. Now, here is a translation of the recorded thoughts and deeds that best remember Confucius--informed for the first time by the manuscript version found at Dingzhou in 1973, a partial text dating to 55 BCE and only made available to the scholarly world in 1997. The earliest Analects yet discovered, this work provides us with a new perspective on the central canonical text that has defined Chinese culture--and clearly illuminates the spirit and values of Confucius.

Confucius (551-479 BCE) was born in the ancient state of Lu into an era of unrelenting, escalating violence as seven of the strongest states in the proto-Chinese world warred for supremacy. The landscape was not only fierce politically but also intellectually. Although Confucius enjoyed great popularity as a teacher, and many of his students found their way into political office, he personally had little influence in Lu. And so he began to travel from state to state as an itinerant philosopher to persuade political leaders that his teachings were a formula for social and political success. Eventually, his philosophies came to dictate the standard of behavior for all of society--including the emperor himself.

Based on the latest research and complete with both Chinese and English texts, this revealing translation serves both as an excellent introduction to Confucian thought and as an authoritative addition to sophisticated debate.

From the Back Cover

"To quietly persevere in storing up what is learned, to continue studying without respite, to instruct others without growing weary--is this not me?"
--Confucius
Confucius is recognized as China''s first and greatest teacher, and his ideas have been the fertile soil in which the Chinese cultural tradition has flourished. Now, here is a translation of the recorded thoughts and deeds that best remember Confucius--informed for the first time by the manuscript version found at Dingzhou in 1973, a partial text dating to 55 BCE and only made available to the scholarly world in 1997. The earliest Analects yet discovered, this work provides us with a new perspective on the central canonical text that has defined Chinese culture--and clearly illuminates the spirit and values of Confucius.
Confucius (551-479 BCE) was born in the ancient state of Lu into an era of unrelenting, escalating violence as seven of the strongest states in the proto-Chinese world warred for supremacy. The landscape was not only fierce politically but also intellectually. Although Confucius enjoyed great popularity as a teacher, and many of his students found their way into political office, he personally had little influence in Lu. And so he began to travel from state to state as an itinerant philosopher to persuade political leaders that his teachings were a formula for social and political success. Eventually, his philosophies came to dictate the standard of behavior for all of society--including the emperor himself.
Based on the latest research and complete with both Chinese and English texts, this revealing translation serves both as an excellent introduction to Confucian thought and as an authoritativeaddition to sophisticated debate.

About the Author

Roger T. Ames is a professor of Chinese philosophy at the University of Hawaii, and the Director of its Center for Chinese Studies. He is also editor of the journals Philosophy East & West and China Review International. He is the author of several interpretative studies on classical Confucianism, including Thinking Through Confucius (with David L. Hall). His earlier translation of Sun-Tzu: The Art of Warfare is recognized as a landmark of contemporary Chinese military and philosophical studies.

Henry Rosemont, Jr. is currently George B. and Willma Reeves Distinguished Professor of the Liberal Arts at St. Mary''s College of Maryland, and Senior Consulting Professor at Fudan University. He is the author of A Chinese Mirror (1991), the forthcoming Radical Confucianism (1998), and more than fifty articles in scholarly journals and anthologies. He is the editor of the Monograph Series for the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

INTRODUCTION
 
HISTORICAL AND TEXTUAL BACKGROUND
 
Master Kong  (Confucius)
Confucius (551–479 BCE) is probably the most influential thinker in human history, if influence is determined by the sheer number of people who have lived their lives, and died, in accordance with the thinker’s vision of how people ought to live, and die. Like many other epochal figures of the ancient world—Socrates, Buddha, Jesus—Confucius does not seem to have written anything that is clearly attributable to him; all that we know of his vision directly must be pieced together from the several accounts of his teachings, and his life, found in the present text, the Analects, and other collateral but perhaps less reliable sources such as the Mencius and the Zuo Commentary to the Spring and Autumn Annals.
 
Recognized as China’s first great teacher both chronologically and in importance, Confucius’ ideas have been the fertile soil in which the Chinese cultural tradition has been cultivated and has flourished. In fact, whatever we might mean by “Chineseness” today, some two and a half millennia after his death, is inseparable from the example of personal character that Confucius provided for posterity. And his influence did not end with China. All of the sinitic cultures—especially Korea, Japan, and Vietnam—have evolved around ways of living and thinking derived in significant measure from his ideas as set down by his disciples and others after his death—ideas that are by no means irrelevant to contemporary social, political, moral, and religious concerns.
 
Confucius was born in the ancient state of Lu (in modern Shandong province) during one of the most formative periods of Chinese culture. Two centuries before his birth, scores of small city-states owing their allegiance to the imperial House of Zhou filled the Yellow River basin. This was the Zhou dynasty (traditionally, 1122–256 BCE) out of which the empire of China was later to emerge. By the time of Confucius’ birth only fourteen independent states remained, with seven of the strongest contending with each other militarily for hegemony over the central plains. It was a period of escalating internecine violence, driven by the knowledge that no state was exempt, and that all comers were competing in a zero-sum game—to fail to win was to perish. The accelerating ferocity of battle was like the increasing frequency and severity of labor pains, anticipating the eventual birth of the imperial Chinese state.
 
The landscape was diverse not only politically. Intellectually, Confucius set a pattern for the “Hundred Schools” that emerged during these centuries in their competition for doctrinal supremacy. He founded an academy in his own state of Lu and, later in his career, he began the practice of independent philosophers traveling from state to state to persuade political leaders that the particular teachings developed in their academies were a practicable formula for social and political success. In the decades that followed his death, intellectuals of every stripe—Confucians, Legalists, Mohists, Yinyang Theorists, Militarists—would take to the road, often attracted by court-sponsored academies which sprang up to host them. Within these seats of learning and at the courts themselves, the viability of their various strategies for political and social unity would be hotly debated.
 
Confucius said of himself that “Following the proper way, I do not forge new paths” (7.1),4 allowing that he was a transmitter rather than an innovator, a classicist rather than a philosopher. This autobiographical statement is not altogether accurate—Confucius was an original thinker by any standard—but the statement captures a basic characteristic of what came to be called Confucianism: a deep respect and affection for the rich cultural Chinese past, what in the Analects is called “the love of learning (haoxue ).” Confucius saw human flourishing as definitive of the reigns of the ancient sage kings, and he advocated a reauthorization of their ways of governing that had been passed on. According to Confucius—and the other two ancient texts he cites the Book of Documents and the Book of Songs5—the ancient sage kings who governed by observing ritual propriety and custom (the li ) rather than by law and force, were themselves reverent toward their past, were more concerned to insure the material and the spiritual well-being of the people than to accumulate personal wealth, and saw as their main task the maintenance of harmony between their community and the rest of the natural order. Confucius wished to reanimate this tradition, and pass it on to succeeding generations.
 
As a teacher, Confucius expected a high degree of commitment to learning from his students. On the one hand, he was tolerant and inclusive. He made no distinction among the economic classes in selecting his students, and would take whatever they could afford in payment for his services (7.7). His favorite student, Yan Hui, was desperately poor, a fact that simply added to Confucius’ admiration for him (6.11, 6.3). On the other hand, Confucius set high standards, and if students did not approach their lessons with seriousness and enthusiasm, Confucius would not suffer them (7.8).
 
Over his lifetime, Confucius attracted a fairly large group of such serious followers, and provided them not only with book learning, but with a curriculum that encouraged personal articulation and refinement on several fronts. His “six arts” included observing propriety and ceremony (li), performing music, and developing proficiency in archery, charioteering, writing, and calculation, all of which, in sum, were directed more at cultivating the moral character of his charges than at any set of practical skills. In the Chinese tradition broadly, proficiency in the “arts” has been seen as the medium through which one reveals the quality of one’s personhood.
 
Although Confucius enjoyed great popularity as a teacher and many of his students found their way into political office, his enduring frustration was that he personally achieved only marginal influence in the practical politics of the day. He was a philosophe rather than a theoretical philosopher; he wanted to be actively involved in intellectual and social trends, and to improve the quality of life that was dependent upon them. Although there were many occasions on which important political figures sought his advice and services during his years in the state of Lu, he held only minor offices at court. When finally Confucius was appointed as police commissioner late in his career, his advice was not heeded, and he was not treated by the Lu court with appropriate courtesy. Earlier, Confucius had made several brief trips to neighboring states, but, after being mistreated in the performance of court sacrifices at home, he determined to take his message on the road again, this time more broadly.
 
These were troubled times, and there was great adventure and much danger in offering counsel to the competing political centers of his day. In his early fifties, he traveled widely as an itinerant counselor, and several times came under the threat of death (9.5). He was not any more successful in securing preferment abroad than he had been at home, to which he eventually returned and lived out his last few years as a counselor of the lower rank and, according to later accounts, continued his compilation of the classics. He died in 479 BCE, almost surely believing his life had been, on the whole, politically and practically worthless.
 
 

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
115 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Captain Jack
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wisdom unparalleled
Reviewed in the United States on July 6, 2021
If you need confirmation that Confucius is easily the equal of Plato, then this book is for you.
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Nick Poulos
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful work: the introduction is superb
Reviewed in the United States on August 3, 2021
Extremely well presented with Hanzi for reference
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Will Jerom
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Good Read
Reviewed in the United States on April 5, 2009
Roger Ames and Henry Rosemont offer a new translation of this Chinese classic of Confucius. While I am not qualified to comment on the accuracy or integrity of the translation, Ames and Rosemont have explained and offered justifications for their translations quite... See more
Roger Ames and Henry Rosemont offer a new translation of this Chinese classic of Confucius. While I am not qualified to comment on the accuracy or integrity of the translation, Ames and Rosemont have explained and offered justifications for their translations quite thoroughly. The result is an informative version of this classic text attributed to Confucius. Heavily discussing the ethics of ritual propriety and the need to be a "junzi" or "exemplary person", Confucius believed in wisdom and the law of reciprocity (the "silver rule"). Clearly he was concerned with preserving a moral tradition extracted from the collective understanding of the past. While parts of Ames and Rosemont''s introduction are tedious and could be better written, overall they have made a valuable contribution to the understanding of Confucian thought.
7 people found this helpful
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Mike, Brunswick
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Perfect when you have 5 minutes.
Reviewed in the United States on May 28, 2018
There are some real nuggets.

Broken up into many small entries, although it doesn''t help continuity it is perfect when you are waiting for a meeting to start.

A difficult read, but, the ability to look up words right in the document is very helpful.
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friend
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I can''t comment on the translation as this is not ...
Reviewed in the United States on November 28, 2014
I can''t comment on the translation as this is not my field. Reviewing from Joe Schmoe''s point of view. Ames provides historical context and constructs a framework at the beginning of the book with which to think about Confucius''s teachings. The framework is... See more
I can''t comment on the translation as this is not my field. Reviewing from Joe Schmoe''s point of view.

Ames provides historical context and constructs a framework at the beginning of the book with which to think about Confucius''s teachings. The framework is applied consistently throughout this book, making it not only a much more enjoyable read but one where the meaning of translation comes to life. I am very thankful that Ames wrote this book as it has allowed me a glimpse into my heritage.
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John O. Dixon
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Amazing translation
Reviewed in the United States on December 13, 2018
Easy to comprehend, captivating, informative. Everyone should read this translation!
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Heathathon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book!
Reviewed in the United States on March 4, 2016
Everyone should read this book. I recommend taking notes in the sides of the pages to look back at later and also to see how your views change as you move along in the book and think more and more!
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John Stutt
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This book is useful to understand Confucius''s place in history.
Reviewed in the United States on April 29, 2021
The book contains useful information to understand the time of Confucius with numerous footnotes.
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Mr X
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Fascinating read.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 25, 2021
The great thing about this translation of the Analects is that it gives you the original text in both English and Chinese in one section, and a commentary with historical detail in another. No mixing-up in this book.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great service for an AMAZING book!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 20, 2021
This book is AMAZING ! If you really want to focus on an Eastern Philosophy (have time to focus & try extreme to learn) This book will Change YoU!
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mirobola
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting insight
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on February 19, 2016
Much more interesting than I had anticipated, with a careful study of the rules that make up the fabric of an ordered society. It''s not his fault that the interpretation became too rigid. as happens.
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Magnomaly
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
quick summation
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 7, 2015
how can I review this, it is what it is, a classic of Oriental philosophy. Even if you prefer Daoism this is still worth a read.
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Enkelkind
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
An excellent and very valuable work, but buy it in printed format, kindle edition quite poor.
Reviewed in Australia on February 12, 2014
I wish I had shelled out a few extra dollars and bought this excellent translation in hard copy! This bilingual edition includes the original Chinese text (traditional characters) but the visual appearance of the characters is ruined in the kindle edition by extremely...See more
I wish I had shelled out a few extra dollars and bought this excellent translation in hard copy! This bilingual edition includes the original Chinese text (traditional characters) but the visual appearance of the characters is ruined in the kindle edition by extremely offputting graininess and pixelation. Unless the Chinese text is of no interest to you at all, you should buy the paper version. So disappointing. The more simple characters, such as 心、仁 and so on, are readable albeit ugly, but more intricate characters such as 德 just look like squarish blobs. Worse, increasing the text size makes no difference to the Chinese characters, which are apparently some kind of low resolution graphic inset, and so you can''t blow them up to the point where you can make them out. Moreover, the fixed size of each piece of Chinese text varies from passage to passage, so some short passages have huge but grainy characters, while others have small and eyestrain-inducing ones. And that''s not all - thee are a few typos in the translation itself, especially in the phonetic romanisation of Chinese terms. Don''t rely on the text of this kindle edition if you are citing it in an essay! Do your eyes a favour and buy the real book.
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The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale

The Analects of Confucius: new arrival A Philosophical Translation (Classics new arrival of Ancient China) outlet sale